Integration spotlight: Google Translate

Overview

Our Google Translate integration lets you translate text using Google’s translation engine straight from your spreadsheet!

Pricing and API limits

For each function execution, you are charged $0.02 for 1000 characters. If you’re translating HTML text, the tags (for example <p>) are also counted.

Functions

Function Description
DETECT_LANGUAGE_GOOGLE Detect the language of a text.
LANGUAGES_GOOGLE Get a list of supported languages.
TRANSLATE_GOOGLE Translate a text from one language to another.

DETECT_LANGUAGE_GOOGLE

Use DETECT_LANGUAGE_GOOGLE to quickly find out the language of a text. You can also see how confident Google’s API is in recognizing the language if you set the short parameter to false.

Syntax

DETECT_LANGUAGE_GOOGLE(text, [short])

Parameter Mandatory Description
text Yes The text you want to get the language for. For example: "The quick brown fox".
short No Boolean indicating whether or not to return additional information for the translation. Choose either:
- TRUE to get the translation only (default)
- FALSE to get additional information"

Examples

To get the language of the text Not too shabby, right?:

=DETECT_LANGUAGE_GOOGLE("Not too shabby, right?")

To get the language of co along with the confidence score of the detection:

=DETECT_LANGUAGE_GOOGLE("co",false)

Detect language example

LANGUAGES_GOOGLE

Use LANGUAGES_GOOGLE to get a full list of languages that Google’s API support translation to and from. You can get all the info into a table quickly and easily by using our Languages recommended table.

LANGUAGES_GOOGLE

FUNCTION([target], [model])

Parameter Mandatory Description
target No Target language ISO 639-1 code. For example: "fr" or "en" (default).
model No The translation model. Choose either:
- "base" for the Phrase-Based Machine Translation (PBMT) model
- "nmt" for the Neural Machine Translation (NMT) model (default)

:memo:Note: If you add a target, you’ll also get that language’s name for the supported language. For example, if you put in the code for the Czech language, cs, the en entry will also have the Czech translation for the English language: angličtina.

Examples

To get a full list of supported languages:

=LANGUAGES_GOOGLE()

To get a list of supported languages in Czech:

=LANGUAGES_GOOGLE("cs")

To get a list of supported languages in Czech that can use Phrase-Based Machine Translation :

=LANGUAGES_GOOGLE("cs","base")

Languages example

TRANSLATE_GOOGLE

Use TRANSLATE_GOOGLE to get one text translated from one language into another. If your text is actually HTML, make sure to change the format parameter to "html".

Syntax

TRANSLATE_GOOGLE(text, [source], [target], [short], [format], [model])

Parameter Mandatory Description
text Yes The text to translate. For example: "Hello world!".
source No Source language ISO 639-1 code. For example: "en". If not provided, Google auto-detects the language.
target No Target language ISO 639-1 code. For example: "fr" or "en" (default).
short No Boolean indicating whether or not to return additional information for the translation. Choose either:
- TRUE to get the translation only (default)
- FALSE to get additional information"
format No The format of the source text. Choose either:
- "text" for plain-text (default)
- "html" for HTML
model No The translation model. Choose either:
- "base" for the Phrase-Based Machine Translation (PBMT) model
- "nmt" for the Neural Machine Translation (NMT) model (default)

Examples

Let’s say you want to translate the text Not too shabby, right? from en to pt. Then you just simply do this:

=TRANSLATE_GOOGLE("Not too shabby, right?","en","pt")

Translate example

Summary

And if you just want to do it all with one click - try your Translate text with Google template :wink:.

Now all that’s left is for you to build and awesome translation app :rocket:!